The Upcycle: Beyond Sustainability–Designing for Abundance

Posted by on May 31, 2014 in Editing | No Comments
The Upcycle: Beyond Sustainability–Designing for Abundance

The Upcycle is the eagerly awaited follow-up to Cradle to Cradle, one of the most consequential ecological manifestoes of our time. Now, drawing on the lessons gained from 10 years of putting the Cradle to Cradle concept into practice with businesses, governments, and ordinary people, William McDonough and Michael Braungart envision the next step in the solution to our ecological crisis: We don’t just use or reuse resources with greater effectiveness, we actually improve the world as we live, create, and build.

The Right Words at the Right Time

Posted by on May 30, 2014 in Editing | No Comments
The Right Words at the Right Time

A collection of personal revelations in essays from over 100 of today’s greatest luminaries whose lives were changed by hearing the right words at the right time. Includes Mohammad Ali, Steven Spielberg, Toni Morrison, Jack Nicholson, Tom Wolfe, Hillary Clinton, the Dalai Lama, President Jimmy Carter, Ted Turner, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Paul McCartney and more. A New York Times #1 bestseller.

Three Strides Before the Wire: The Dark and Beautiful World of Horse Racing

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Cultural | No Comments
Three Strides Before the Wire: The Dark and Beautiful World of Horse Racing

I. DREAM TRIP

The meteorologists of Louisville, Kentucky, could not quite believe how perfectly calibrated the barometric pressure was that first Saturday in May 1999. The skies were as blue as the bottom of a freshly painted pool. The white clapboard steeples of Churchill Downs, which had loomed over thoroughbred races since the turn of the century, were brilliant in the sunshine. That spring, La Nina, the rare weather phenomenon chilling the waters of the equator thirty-five hundred miles away, had communicated its meteorogical message north, and now Louisville, and more specifically, the crowds gathering for the last Kentucky Derby of the millennium, were wallowing in heat and happiness. I was there with a man whom I adored. He was tanned, gaining muscle, and proudly cultivating a head of baby-soft hair. It was the first time we had ever been to a thoroughbred track and a perfect day to fall in love with racing.

Only nine weeks earlier, this man—Chuck Fulgham—had emerged from the hospital after a second month of chemotherapy treatments without hair, eyelashes, eyebrows; with fingernails peeling off at the thickened tips. Over those many weeks of his treatment for leukemia at Baylor Hospital in Dallas, he had dwindled around his bones until he was just a six-foot four-inch wraith who got winded walking across a room. But he had rallied back in that vivid, love-infused spring, and it was for that reason Chuck and I felt our very presence among the drunken, happy hordes of the Churchill Downs infield was a victory, no matter what happened for us at the betting windows.

The Genius of Cecile Richards

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Political | No Comments
The Genius of Cecile Richards

Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards heard whispers that the Susan G. Komen foundation would stop funding Planned Parenthood’s breast cancer screenings from an anti-choice blog in early December. But she shrugged it off as the kind of bullying rumor that often circulates in her world. (Until Planned Parenthood, she says, “I had never worked with an organization where there were people that literally got up every day trying to figure out how to keep us from doing our work.”) Then the Komen foundation president called just before Christmas to say it was true. “It came as a total surprise,” says Richards, who requested a meeting with Komen’s board to revisit the matter but was denied.

It was only after an Associated Press reporter broke the story in late January that Richards let loose the deluge. “Disappointing news from a friend” was the subject line on Richards’s January 31 late afternoon e-mail to more than a million supporters. The first Facebook posting on the subject received 2,438 shares.

Four days later, Planned Parenthood boasted $3 million in new funding; 32,000 new Facebook fans; 22,000 people who “shared” the freshly inaugurated Planned Parenthood Facebook badge, leading to upward of 100,000 new viewers of the site; the very public support of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who donated $250,000 to the organization; vast television and radio exposure; and… the Komen funding back in place.

How exactly did Cecile Richards pull off this trick?

Kate Moss: America’s Obsession

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in Cultural | No Comments
Kate Moss: America’s Obsession

If Kate Moss were to open her ripe, Cupid’s-bow mouth to make a public statement, it would go something like this: “I’m not anorexic, I’m not a heroin addict, I’m not pregnant – all the shit they fucking say about me is not true. It’s a load of lies the media made.” Moss pauses for breath.

She is a lot of life when you meet her outside a picture.

Moss is not making a statement. She’s enduring an interview, a process she hates because she doesn’t want to give any more of herself away. This is the girl who was stripped of makeup and clothes, and pinned up everywhere; who appeared in such profusion throughout the pages of Harper’s Bazaar that it seemed like a family album; who, preserved by Calvin Klein in the silence of photographs, has waited with us for buses, has lingered against the walls of buildings, gazed out from Times Square – the kind of repetition of image that world leaders as savvy as Marshal Tito have employed to hold the savage, furious fragments of their nations together, and which, in our country, sells perfume and underpants.

W: Revenge of the Bush Dynasty

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in Political | No Comments
W: Revenge of the Bush Dynasty

An icy drizzle dampened the spare crowd of onlookers as George W. Bush wended his way to the Capitol to take the oath of office on January 20, 2001. By the time the new chief executive sat in the viewing stand to watch the inaugural parade hours later, his only fellow celebrants seemed to be the family members and longtime friends seated nearby. Empty bleachers extended to either side. Maybe the day wasn’t as frigid as the inaugural that ultimately condemned William Henry Harrison to death by pneumonia, but by most measures it was bleak.

The raw weather could not take all the blame for drowning the party atmosphere. The real drain had been the bitter feelings left after thirty-six days of a contested presidential election, ultimately decided when the Supreme Court halted the recounting in Florida. In inaugural attendance, Bush’s day did come close to topping one record: police estimated that only Richard Nixon had more protesters, when he began his second term in 1973. Heavily bundled men and women greeted President George W. Bush along the route, holding up signs: “Hail to the Thief,” to signal their belief that Al Gore, Bush’s opponent, would have won not only the popular vote, but the electoral vote if a conservative Supreme Court had not intervened. “Lord Help Us,” another protest sign appealed, probably in reference to a widespread belief that a stupid, inexperienced man had ascended to the highest office in the land.

Eight months later to the day, George W. Bush delivered a speech before a joint session of Congress that was interrupted by wave after wave of wild applause. More than 80 million Americans tuned in on television to see him and apparently liked what he said. A poll conducted two days after the address placed his popularity at 90 percent, the highest approval rating for any president since such polls first were conducted in 1938. George W. Bush had become in eight months the most loved president in modern history.

That lightning change in public opinion would sound like a presidential fantasy, but of course such adulation was earned through the most tragic means. George W. Bush’s support arrived with the grisly deaths of 3,056 people on September 11, 2001.

Domestic Affairs

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in Editing | No Comments
Domestic Affairs

When twenty-something political fundraiser Olivia Greenley is recruited by her close friend Jacob Harriston to join the Presidential campaign of Georgia Governor Landon Taylor, she is intoxicated by optimism and opportunity. Taylor’s commitment to social equality and economic responsibility in the post-housing-bubble era is palpable. Sacrificing her sleep, comfort and income are certain to help make the world a better place. Right?

Domestic Affairs: A Campaign Novel vividly captures the fervor and idealism of campaign life—as well as the disillusionment staffers feel when told to make the inevitable compromises.

Meet Your Maker: Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi

Posted by on May 28, 2014 in Blog & Events | One Comment
Meet Your Maker: Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi

The Statue of Liberty is America’s most famous symbol, yet few people could name the man who imagined, created, championed, groveled for, lost sleep over, and unveiled the colossus. The accepted history goes that France gave Liberty to America as an act of friendship, but this was not a gift from government to government. Instead, one artist envisioned a colossus. He designed her to stand in the harbor of the Suez Canal, but the deal fell through. He needed to sell his work somewhere, so he headed to America:

“Each site presents some difficulty,” he wrote to his mother on his journey in 1871. “But the greatest difficulty, I believe, will be the American character which is hardly open to things of the imagination. . . . I believe that the realization of my project will be a matter of luck.”

Anita Hill’s Afterlife

Posted by on May 27, 2014 in Political | No Comments
Anita Hill’s Afterlife

As a teenager in Oklahoma, Anita Hill showed uncanny prescience in choosing a hero for the life that awaited her: Barbara Jordan, the outspoken 38-year-old congresswoman who captivated the nation when she forcefully defended the constitution during Richard Nixon’s impeachment proceedings. “I was watching the Watergate hearings, and I thought, This is the bravest woman—and she’s from Texas? Next door to me? This black woman is out there, and she’s a star in these hearings. She’s sitting with all these guys, and she’s definitely not a shrinking violet.” The image worked for Hill, Suddenly, she could envision how “you could be in the kind of skin that I was in, maybe even come from the same background, and make an impact on the world.”

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